New York Times Op-ed on Holy Weekend: LET’S GET RID OF GOD

I hate to break it to the author of this NYT piece, but you CAN’T get rid of the Creator of the Universe. BUT He has plans to get rid of you if you do not repent and trust His plan of Salvation!

And if you knew where God plans to place you for eternity – it would shock you to the core of your being.

From breitbart.com

The New York Times published an op-ed Friday that proposes eliminating belief in God — as one of the holiest weekends of the year begins.

Titled “In This Time of War, I Propose We Give Up God,” the article claims that God is responsible for “war and violence” and for “oppression and suffering,” and suggests that people stop teaching children about Him.

Author Shalom Auslander, who is disillusioned about his upbringing in a religious Jewish community in New York, argues (original emphasis):

God, it seems, paints with a wide brush. He paints with a roller. In Egypt, said our rabbi, he even killed first-born cattle. He killed cows. If he were mortal, the God of Jews, Christians and Muslims would be dragged to The Hague. And yet we praise him. We emulate him. We implore our children to be like him.

Perhaps now, as missiles rain down and the dead are discovered in mass graves, is a good time to stop emulating this hateful God. Perhaps we can stop extolling his brutality. Perhaps now is a good time to teach our children to pass over God — to be as unlike him as possible.

Killing god is an idea I can get behind.

Good Friday is widely observed on Friday, followed by Easter Sunday; Passover is observed starting on Friday night.

NYT ARTICLE:

“In This Time of War, I Propose We Give Up God”

By Shalom Auslander

****Yes, you read that name correctly. A Jewish man who wants to kill God. Oy Vey!

The ridiculous NYT piece:

This weekend, Jews around the world will celebrate the holiday of Passover, the name of which comes from the story of God “passing over” the homes of our distant ancestors on his way to slaughter the first born sons of evil Egyptians. Our forefathers, the story goes, marked their doorposts with lamb’s blood in order to spare their own sons the awful fate of their enemies.

In this time of war and violence, of oppression and suffering, I propose we pass over something else:

God.

Two aspects of the Passover story have troubled me since I was first taught them long ago in an Orthodox yeshiva in Monsey, N.Y. I was 8 years old, and as the holiday approached, our rabbi commanded us to open our chumashim, or Old Testaments, to the Book of Exodus. To get us in the holiday spirit, he told us gruesome tales of torture and persecution.

“The Egyptians,” he told us, “used the corpses of Jewish slaves in their buildings.”

“You mean they used slaves to build their buildings,” I asked, “and the slaves died from work?”

“No,” said the rabbi. “They put the Jewish bodies into the walls and used them as bricks.”

My father was something of a handyman at the time, and this seemed to me a serious violation of basic building codes, not to mention a surefire way to lose a home sale.

“Is this brick?” the interested couple asks.

“No, no,” says the realtor. “That’s corpse.”

But just as troubling — even more so today in light of the brutal slaughter taking place in Ukraine — were the plagues themselves.

God, the rabbi said, struck all the Egyptians with his wrath, not just Pharaoh and his soldiers. Egyptians young and old, innocent and guilty, suffered locusts and frogs, hail and darkness, beasts running wild and water becoming blood. Mothers nursing their babies, the rabbi explained, found their breast milk had turned to blood.

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“Yay!” my classmates cheered.

But Pharaoh, the story continues, still wouldn’t relinquish his slaves. Technically this was God’s fault as he “hardened Pharaoh’s heart,” but the issue of free will wouldn’t begin troubling me until my teens. And so God, in his mercy, started killing babies.

“Every firstborn son in the land of Egypt shall die, from the firstborn of Pharaoh who sits on the throne to the firstborn of the servant girl.” Exodus 11:5.

Surely, I wondered, there were some Egyptians who didn’t whip Jews, who didn’t have anything against Jews at all? Surely there were Egyptians horrified by slavery, Egyptians who disagreed with Pharaoh as often as we do with our own leaders?

“Everyone?” I asked the rabbi. “He struck everyone?”

“Everyone,” the rabbi said.

“Yay!” my classmates cheered.

God, it seems, paints with a wide brush. He paints with a roller. In Egypt, said our rabbi, he even killed first-born cattle. He killed cows. If he were mortal, the God of Jews, Christians and Muslims would be dragged to The Hague. And yet we praise him. We emulate him. We implore our children to be like him.

Perhaps now, as missiles rain down and the dead are discovered in mass graves, is a good time to stop emulating this hateful God. Perhaps we can stop extolling his brutality. Perhaps now is a good time to teach our children to pass over God — to be as unlike him as possible.

“And so God killed them all,” the rabbis and priests and imams can preach to their classrooms. “That was wrong, children.”

“God threw Adam out of Eden for eating an apple,” they can caution their students. “That’s called being heavy-handed, children.”

Cursing all women for eternity because of Eve’s choices?

“That’s called collective punishment, children,” they can warn the young. “Don’t do that.”

“Boo!” the children will jeer.

I was raised strictly Orthodox. Old school. Shtetl fabulous. Every year, at the beginning of the Seder, we welcome in the hungry and poor Jews who can’t afford to have a Seder themselves. It’s a wonderfully human gesture. A few short hours of God later, at the end of the Seder, we open the front door and call out to Him, “Pour out thy wrath upon the nations that did not know you!”

And God does. With plagues and floods, with fire and fury, on the young and old, the guilty and innocent.

And we humans, made in his image, do the same. With fixed-wing bombers and cluster bombs, with self-propelled mortars and thermobaric rocket launchers.

“Why did God kill the first-born cattle?” my rabbi said. “Because the Egyptians believed they were gods.”

Killing gods is an idea I can get behind.

This year, at the end of the Seder, let’s indeed throw our doors open — to strangers. To people who aren’t our own. To the terrifying them, to the evil others, those people who seem so different from us, those we think are our enemies or who think us theirs, but who, if they sat down around the table with us, we’d no doubt find despise the pharaohs of this world as much as we do, and who dream of the same damned thing as us all:

Peace. Source

Brothers and sisters in Christ, let’s pray for Shalom; although he may be one who GOD has given over to his reprobate mind. But if GOD has not, may Shalom know true SHALOM IN YESHUA.

How Can I Be Saved?

MARANATHA!

9 thoughts on “New York Times Op-ed on Holy Weekend: LET’S GET RID OF GOD

  1. robinlinaz

    Over just the past few weeks I have seen an escalation of open, brazen God hatred like never before! It makes me shudder every time.

    There is no fear of God among so many today, they blaspheme, mock and taunt Him. They compare Him and His works to man, not understanding that all of His ways and thoughts are far better and above our ways and thoughts. He is infinitely loving, forgiving, generous, kind and gracious to all who love Him and worship Him as He has ordained and absolutely deserves.

    The man who wrote this article needs to study Job 38 and 39, with an open and repentant heart, where he would learn that God, in His goodness and mercy, responds to man’s questioning of Him and His ways.

    Without a fear of God there can be NO wisdom.

    The world’s rebellion is only beginning to get bad, this is just a taste of what it will be like when the Restrainer is taken out of the way. Days of Noah, that is for sure :(.

  2. Fred

    What’s astounding is all those folks who say God us dead or want to dispose of the body, etc., will end up in all eternity experiencing God’s absolute wrath. They won’t get their wish to be out of His Presence.

    1. Mark V

      EVERY knee will bow, EVERY tongue will confess. God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. His mercy endures forever!

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